LOKELMATM Sodium Zirconium Cyclosilicate

SWIFT* K+ REDUCTION AFTER ONE HOUR.1,2
SUSTAINED K+ CONTROL FOR UP TO ONE YEAR
WHEN USED AS A MAINTENANCE THERAPY.†1
NOW IN YOUR HANDS.
New, highly-selective LOKELMA (sodium zirconium cyclosilicate)
is indicated for the treatment of hyperkalaemia in adult patients1

*In an emergency situation, standard of care should be used in line with local or national guidelines
Clinical trials with LOKELMA have not included exposure longer than one year

About Hyperkalaemia

The consequences of hyperkalaemia can be life threatening5,6

Hyperkalaemia is often asymptomatic and can progress rapidly.5

Severe hyperkalaemia is a medical emergency that may cause arrhythmia and sudden death.*5

Elevated K+ is a significant predictor of mortality in patients with critical illnesses or conditions like chronic kidney disease, diabetes mellitus and heart failure.7-9

*In an emergency situation, standard of care should be used in line with local or national guidelines.

Hyperkalaemia and Chronic Kidney Disease

As plasma K+ levels rise above 5.0 mmol/L in patients with chronic kidney disease,
there is an associated increased risk of mortality and hospitalisation.7,18,19

Mortality

A real world evidence UK CPRD study of more than 190,000 patients with CKD showed that the adjusted incidence rate ratio* (IRR) for mortality for patients with serum K+ ≥5.5 to <6.0 mmol/L was 1.60 (95% CI: 1.52–1.68), and this increased to 2.88 (2.61–3.18) when serum K+ was ≥6.0 mmol/L.19

Hospitalisation

A Danish population level study of more than 150,000 patients with CKD showed: when compared with non-hyperkalaemia patients, 6-month hazard ratios for any acute hospitalisation in hyperkalaemia patients were 2.11-fold higher: including prior event rate ratio adjusted hazard ratios of 2.07 for cardiac diagnoses, 2.29 for ventricular arrhythmias, 3.26 for cardiac arrest, 4.77 for intensive care and 4.85 for death.7

*IRRs were adjusted for covariates, included as explanatory variables in the risk equations. Adjusted IRRs relating serum K+ to the incidence of mortality and MACE estimated by the fitted risk equations were validated against a US study of similar design.6